Dr. Linda Harris Fastwave
Dr. Linda Harris Fastwave
Dr. Linda Harris Fastwave

Interview with Dr. Linda Harris

Keeping pace with the latest advancements in medicine is a challenge for us all. The insights of seasoned professionals like Dr. Linda Harris, with her impeccable credentials and a heart devoted to the medical community, offer a fresh perspective into the field of vascular surgery.

Having joined the University of Buffalo Medical Doctor (UBMD) Surgery in 1995, Dr. Linda Harris now serves as a Professor of Surgery with tenure in the Department of Surgery. A double board-certified surgeon in Vascular and General Surgery, she has illuminated the medical world with 68 publications and countless presentations and has been the recipient of 21 distinct awards and honors. Currently co-editing a book on vascular surgery, Dr. Harris is known for her contributions to Graduate Medical Education, the Executive Council for the Department of Surgery, and as the representative for the Academic Leadership Group for the Department of Surgery at Kaleida Health. Specializing in a myriad of vascular surgeries, she also oversees the Vascular Surgery Residency and Fellowship program at the University at Buffalo while serving as a Vascular Surgeon at Kaleida Health.

Shortly after you completed your fellowship training, was there a therapy area or subject matter you wish you were taught or had more experience in? 

When I finished training, endovascular interventions were just emerging. While I had received some training during my fellowship, like many of us, I gained practical experience through collaborating with radiologists. 

Many residents and fellows leave training with a sense that they aren’t fully ready for clinical practice. Do you remember a time when you felt like you weren’t ready for “prime time”? How did you overcome this?  

It’s essential to recognize that certain clinical scenarios will require consulting with senior colleagues or other partners. Even if you’re a new resident who feels relatively comfortable with most procedures, the onus of the patient and the outcome can be daunting. It’s important to remember that for a new faculty member, seeking assistance or a second opinion, especially in the early stages, is not a sign of inadequacy — it’s prudent. Most often, you won’t actually need the help, but it’s good practice to err on the side of caution and prioritize patient outcomes above else.

Considering you’re well-published and have extensive experience in medical research, how would you recommend a fellow get involved with clinical trials and/or establish collaborative research with other specialists? 

The first thing to do is to identify the area where your genuine interest lies and where you have the adequate clinical caseload to support your research. If you love aortic disease but rarely see it, you are unlikely to be able to do good clinical research in that area.  

To get involved with trials, you first need to have the clinical volume to be able to sustain a study. Then you need a company to collaborate with on the study. Once you find it, try to leverage your connections — mentors and colleagues — to introduce you. To do clinical research, you also need a clinical coordinator, potentially part-time initially. Then, when you are selected for a trial, you’ll also need to enroll patients. 

To get a foothold in research as a fellow, look for ways to engage with the industry. Regional and national meetings are great for networking with researchers. Collaborative research usually begins with identifying common interests and initiating conversations. Actively participating and presenting your ideas leads to valuable connections and research opportunities. By doing so, you also increase your visibility to companies, which is beneficial if you want to be considered in clinical trials and research collaborations.

If you are applying for grants, be aware that it’s extremely unlikely that you will get funded on the first attempt. Almost every accomplished researcher will face rejections before success. 

When it comes to treating challenging calcific plaque in the periphery, what’s your go-to algorithm? 

There are a range of endovascular interventions available, and it’s important to remember that open surgical methods are an option as well. The primary challenge with calcified lesions, like all lesions, is crossing them. I appreciate using intravascular lithotripsy combined with drug-coated balloons (DCB). I try to avoid stenting unless it is absolutely necessary. 

Having joined the University of Buffalo Medical Doctor (UBMD) Surgery in 1995, Dr. Linda Harris now serves as a Professor of Surgery with tenure in the Department of Surgery. A double board-certified surgeon in Vascular and General Surgery, she has illuminated the medical world with 68 publications and countless presentations and has been the recipient of 21 distinct awards and honors. Currently co-editing a book on vascular surgery, Dr. Harris is known for her contributions to Graduate Medical Education, the Executive Council for the Department of Surgery, and as the representative for the Academic Leadership Group for the Department of Surgery at Kaleida Health. Specializing in a myriad of vascular surgeries, she also oversees the Vascular Surgery Residency and Fellowship program at the University at Buffalo while serving as a Vascular Surgeon at Kaleida Health.

Shortly after you completed your fellowship training, was there a therapy area or subject matter you wish you were taught or had more experience in? 

When I finished training, endovascular interventions were just emerging. While I had received some training during my fellowship, like many of us, I gained practical experience through collaborating with radiologists. 

Many residents and fellows leave training with a sense that they aren’t fully ready for clinical practice. Do you remember a time when you felt like you weren’t ready for “prime time”? How did you overcome this?  

It’s essential to recognize that certain clinical scenarios will require consulting with senior colleagues or other partners. Even if you’re a new resident who feels relatively comfortable with most procedures, the onus of the patient and the outcome can be daunting. It’s important to remember that for a new faculty member, seeking assistance or a second opinion, especially in the early stages, is not a sign of inadequacy — it’s prudent. Most often, you won’t actually need the help, but it’s good practice to err on the side of caution and prioritize patient outcomes above else.

Considering you’re well-published and have extensive experience in medical research, how would you recommend a fellow get involved with clinical trials and/or establish collaborative research with other specialists? 

The first thing to do is to identify the area where your genuine interest lies and where you have the adequate clinical caseload to support your research. If you love aortic disease but rarely see it, you are unlikely to be able to do good clinical research in that area.  

To get involved with trials, you first need to have the clinical volume to be able to sustain a study. Then you need a company to collaborate with on the study. Once you find it, try to leverage your connections — mentors and colleagues — to introduce you. To do clinical research, you also need a clinical coordinator, potentially part-time initially. Then, when you are selected for a trial, you’ll also need to enroll patients. 

To get a foothold in research as a fellow, look for ways to engage with the industry. Regional and national meetings are great for networking with researchers. Collaborative research usually begins with identifying common interests and initiating conversations. Actively participating and presenting your ideas leads to valuable connections and research opportunities. By doing so, you also increase your visibility to companies, which is beneficial if you want to be considered in clinical trials and research collaborations.

If you are applying for grants, be aware that it’s extremely unlikely that you will get funded on the first attempt. Almost every accomplished researcher will face rejections before success. 

When it comes to treating challenging calcific plaque in the periphery, what’s your go-to algorithm? 

There are a range of endovascular interventions available, and it’s important to remember that open surgical methods are an option as well. The primary challenge with calcified lesions, like all lesions, is crossing them. I appreciate using intravascular lithotripsy combined with drug-coated balloons (DCB). I try to avoid stenting unless it is absolutely necessary. 

Having joined the University of Buffalo Medical Doctor (UBMD) Surgery in 1995, Dr. Linda Harris now serves as a Professor of Surgery with tenure in the Department of Surgery. A double board-certified surgeon in Vascular and General Surgery, she has illuminated the medical world with 68 publications and countless presentations and has been the recipient of 21 distinct awards and honors. Currently co-editing a book on vascular surgery, Dr. Harris is known for her contributions to Graduate Medical Education, the Executive Council for the Department of Surgery, and as the representative for the Academic Leadership Group for the Department of Surgery at Kaleida Health. Specializing in a myriad of vascular surgeries, she also oversees the Vascular Surgery Residency and Fellowship program at the University at Buffalo while serving as a Vascular Surgeon at Kaleida Health.

Shortly after you completed your fellowship training, was there a therapy area or subject matter you wish you were taught or had more experience in? 

When I finished training, endovascular interventions were just emerging. While I had received some training during my fellowship, like many of us, I gained practical experience through collaborating with radiologists. 

Many residents and fellows leave training with a sense that they aren’t fully ready for clinical practice. Do you remember a time when you felt like you weren’t ready for “prime time”? How did you overcome this?  

It’s essential to recognize that certain clinical scenarios will require consulting with senior colleagues or other partners. Even if you’re a new resident who feels relatively comfortable with most procedures, the onus of the patient and the outcome can be daunting. It’s important to remember that for a new faculty member, seeking assistance or a second opinion, especially in the early stages, is not a sign of inadequacy — it’s prudent. Most often, you won’t actually need the help, but it’s good practice to err on the side of caution and prioritize patient outcomes above else.

Considering you’re well-published and have extensive experience in medical research, how would you recommend a fellow get involved with clinical trials and/or establish collaborative research with other specialists? 

The first thing to do is to identify the area where your genuine interest lies and where you have the adequate clinical caseload to support your research. If you love aortic disease but rarely see it, you are unlikely to be able to do good clinical research in that area.  

To get involved with trials, you first need to have the clinical volume to be able to sustain a study. Then you need a company to collaborate with on the study. Once you find it, try to leverage your connections — mentors and colleagues — to introduce you. To do clinical research, you also need a clinical coordinator, potentially part-time initially. Then, when you are selected for a trial, you’ll also need to enroll patients. 

To get a foothold in research as a fellow, look for ways to engage with the industry. Regional and national meetings are great for networking with researchers. Collaborative research usually begins with identifying common interests and initiating conversations. Actively participating and presenting your ideas leads to valuable connections and research opportunities. By doing so, you also increase your visibility to companies, which is beneficial if you want to be considered in clinical trials and research collaborations.

If you are applying for grants, be aware that it’s extremely unlikely that you will get funded on the first attempt. Almost every accomplished researcher will face rejections before success. 

When it comes to treating challenging calcific plaque in the periphery, what’s your go-to algorithm? 

There are a range of endovascular interventions available, and it’s important to remember that open surgical methods are an option as well. The primary challenge with calcified lesions, like all lesions, is crossing them. I appreciate using intravascular lithotripsy combined with drug-coated balloons (DCB). I try to avoid stenting unless it is absolutely necessary. 

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When thinking about the business of healthcare, what are 2-3 concepts that you wish you knew coming out of fellowship?

Before accepting your first job, ensure you have the necessary resources to succeed. Once you are committed, procuring additional resources can be challenging. Being aware of the value you bring to an institution can guide your requests and negotiations.

You have friends and colleagues across multiple healthcare disciplines and specialties. For a young clinician, how important is networking? Are there 2-3 tips that you can pass along on how to network better or effectively? 

Networking is extremely important. This can not only help you get recognized locally, but regionally and nationally too. Also, if you are looking to move, having a network streamlines job searches. Attending national and regional meetings, utilizing social media, and participating in local hospital events are all effective ways to expand your network with other physicians. Offering to do grand rounds or presentations for local groups can help with this mission, too. 

You speak on podium at many conferences and do a fair amount of physician training. What are some of the important skill sets needed to be an effective leader in these types of initiatives? 

The first thing you need to do is to push your own boundaries. Most people aren’t naturally comfortable speaking in large groups when they first start — I know I wasn’t. I believe thorough subject knowledge builds confidence. Then the only issue is dealing with having all eyes on you. To help overcome that, practicing speaking in smaller settings helps. Also, reviewing your presentation with a mentor can refine your approach. 

So-called “turf wars” are inevitable in almost any workplace setting, including healthcare. How do you approach this challenge and what’s your advice for graduating residents and fellows? 

You need to take the higher road at all times. Multiple specialties will be involved with many areas of patient care, all of whom have a “claim” to the territory. We have to prioritize patient care above all else. Engage in constructive dialogues with peers from different specialties and try to set up multidisciplinary meetings. Recognize the areas where others have more expertise than you and respect that. This fosters mutual respect. Warfare is never a good approach. 

When operating, if you had to choose 3 songs to play on repeat, what would they be? 

I don’t have particular songs that I play. I prefer soft rock or oldies for a calming effect. 

How about movies – what are your top 3 favorites of all time?  

Dirty Dancing, Ghost, and the Star Wars series.

If you could go back to your late 20s or early 30s, what would you tell your younger self from a professional standpoint? 

Believe in yourself and your capabilities. Don’t let anyone undermine your achievements or attribute your success to tokenism. I have suffered from imposter syndrome many times throughout my career. It is not always easy to believe that you deserve everything that you have worked for.  

Last, are there any events, congresses, clinical research, etc. you’d like to raise awareness for?

I would like to raise awareness for the newly formed International Society for Women Vascular Surgeons. Its goal is to deepen the understanding of vascular disease in women and support female professionals. Men and women are both welcome to join. 

Additionally, for budding surgeons, affiliation with both regional and national societies is crucial. Each provides different benefits. I’ve found value in being a part of the Eastern Vascular Society (EVS), Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS), and the Society of Clinical Vascular Surgery (SCVS) for my entire career. And for those who have an interest in venous disease, the American Venous Forum (AVF) is noteworthy. 

When thinking about the business of healthcare, what are 2-3 concepts that you wish you knew coming out of fellowship?

Before accepting your first job, ensure you have the necessary resources to succeed. Once you are committed, procuring additional resources can be challenging. Being aware of the value you bring to an institution can guide your requests and negotiations.

You have friends and colleagues across multiple healthcare disciplines and specialties. For a young clinician, how important is networking? Are there 2-3 tips that you can pass along on how to network better or effectively? 

Networking is extremely important. This can not only help you get recognized locally, but regionally and nationally too. Also, if you are looking to move, having a network streamlines job searches. Attending national and regional meetings, utilizing social media, and participating in local hospital events are all effective ways to expand your network with other physicians. Offering to do grand rounds or presentations for local groups can help with this mission, too. 

You speak on podium at many conferences and do a fair amount of physician training. What are some of the important skill sets needed to be an effective leader in these types of initiatives? 

The first thing you need to do is to push your own boundaries. Most people aren’t naturally comfortable speaking in large groups when they first start — I know I wasn’t. I believe thorough subject knowledge builds confidence. Then the only issue is dealing with having all eyes on you. To help overcome that, practicing speaking in smaller settings helps. Also, reviewing your presentation with a mentor can refine your approach. 

So-called “turf wars” are inevitable in almost any workplace setting, including healthcare. How do you approach this challenge and what’s your advice for graduating residents and fellows? 

You need to take the higher road at all times. Multiple specialties will be involved with many areas of patient care, all of whom have a “claim” to the territory. We have to prioritize patient care above all else. Engage in constructive dialogues with peers from different specialties and try to set up multidisciplinary meetings. Recognize the areas where others have more expertise than you and respect that. This fosters mutual respect. Warfare is never a good approach. 

When operating, if you had to choose 3 songs to play on repeat, what would they be? 

I don’t have particular songs that I play. I prefer soft rock or oldies for a calming effect. 

How about movies – what are your top 3 favorites of all time?  

Dirty Dancing, Ghost, and the Star Wars series.

If you could go back to your late 20s or early 30s, what would you tell your younger self from a professional standpoint? 

Believe in yourself and your capabilities. Don’t let anyone undermine your achievements or attribute your success to tokenism. I have suffered from imposter syndrome many times throughout my career. It is not always easy to believe that you deserve everything that you have worked for.  

Last, are there any events, congresses, clinical research, etc. you’d like to raise awareness for?

I would like to raise awareness for the newly formed International Society for Women Vascular Surgeons. Its goal is to deepen the understanding of vascular disease in women and support female professionals. Men and women are both welcome to join. 

Additionally, for budding surgeons, affiliation with both regional and national societies is crucial. Each provides different benefits. I’ve found value in being a part of the Eastern Vascular Society (EVS), Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS), and the Society of Clinical Vascular Surgery (SCVS) for my entire career. And for those who have an interest in venous disease, the American Venous Forum (AVF) is noteworthy. 

When thinking about the business of healthcare, what are 2-3 concepts that you wish you knew coming out of fellowship?

Before accepting your first job, ensure you have the necessary resources to succeed. Once you are committed, procuring additional resources can be challenging. Being aware of the value you bring to an institution can guide your requests and negotiations.

You have friends and colleagues across multiple healthcare disciplines and specialties. For a young clinician, how important is networking? Are there 2-3 tips that you can pass along on how to network better or effectively? 

Networking is extremely important. This can not only help you get recognized locally, but regionally and nationally too. Also, if you are looking to move, having a network streamlines job searches. Attending national and regional meetings, utilizing social media, and participating in local hospital events are all effective ways to expand your network with other physicians. Offering to do grand rounds or presentations for local groups can help with this mission, too. 

You speak on podium at many conferences and do a fair amount of physician training. What are some of the important skill sets needed to be an effective leader in these types of initiatives? 

The first thing you need to do is to push your own boundaries. Most people aren’t naturally comfortable speaking in large groups when they first start — I know I wasn’t. I believe thorough subject knowledge builds confidence. Then the only issue is dealing with having all eyes on you. To help overcome that, practicing speaking in smaller settings helps. Also, reviewing your presentation with a mentor can refine your approach. 

So-called “turf wars” are inevitable in almost any workplace setting, including healthcare. How do you approach this challenge and what’s your advice for graduating residents and fellows? 

You need to take the higher road at all times. Multiple specialties will be involved with many areas of patient care, all of whom have a “claim” to the territory. We have to prioritize patient care above all else. Engage in constructive dialogues with peers from different specialties and try to set up multidisciplinary meetings. Recognize the areas where others have more expertise than you and respect that. This fosters mutual respect. Warfare is never a good approach. 

When operating, if you had to choose 3 songs to play on repeat, what would they be? 

I don’t have particular songs that I play. I prefer soft rock or oldies for a calming effect. 

How about movies – what are your top 3 favorites of all time?  

Dirty Dancing, Ghost, and the Star Wars series.

If you could go back to your late 20s or early 30s, what would you tell your younger self from a professional standpoint? 

Believe in yourself and your capabilities. Don’t let anyone undermine your achievements or attribute your success to tokenism. I have suffered from imposter syndrome many times throughout my career. It is not always easy to believe that you deserve everything that you have worked for.  

Last, are there any events, congresses, clinical research, etc. you’d like to raise awareness for?

I would like to raise awareness for the newly formed International Society for Women Vascular Surgeons. Its goal is to deepen the understanding of vascular disease in women and support female professionals. Men and women are both welcome to join. 

Additionally, for budding surgeons, affiliation with both regional and national societies is crucial. Each provides different benefits. I’ve found value in being a part of the Eastern Vascular Society (EVS), Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS), and the Society of Clinical Vascular Surgery (SCVS) for my entire career. And for those who have an interest in venous disease, the American Venous Forum (AVF) is noteworthy. 

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IVL is an impressive therapy with an attractive market and I’m very excited about FastWave’s prospects.

Dr. Puneet Khanna

Interventional Cardiologist & Medtech Investor

Join Our Waiting List of Investors

We oversubscribed our last round of financing in just a few weeks, so enter your email below to avoid missing out on the next opportunity to invest.

IVL is an impressive therapy with an attractive market and I’m very excited about FastWave’s prospects.

Dr. Puneet Khanna

Interventional Cardiologist & Medtech Investor

Join Our Waiting List of Investors

We oversubscribed our last round of financing in just a few weeks, so enter your email below to avoid missing out on the next opportunity to invest.

IVL is an impressive therapy with an attractive market and I’m very excited about FastWave’s prospects.

Dr. Puneet Khanna

Interventional Cardiologist & Medtech Investor

Mailing Address:

FastWave Medical
400 S 4th St, Ste 410
PMB 21892
Minneapolis, MN 55415

Phone:

(833) 888-9283

Email:

team@fastwavemedical.com

Follow FastWave’s Journey

© 2024 FastWave Medical Inc.

Mailing Address:

FastWave Medical
400 S 4th St, Ste 410
PMB 21892
Minneapolis, MN 55415

Phone:

(833) 888-9283

Email:

team@fastwavemedical.com

Follow FastWave’s Journey

© 2024 FastWave Medical Inc.

Mailing Address:

FastWave Medical
400 S 4th St, Ste 410
PMB 21892
Minneapolis, MN 55415

Phone:

(833) 888-9283

Email:

team@fastwavemedical.com

Follow FastWave’s Journey

© 2024 FastWave Medical Inc.